Growing in Containers

Growing in Containers

Growing in Containers is not too difficult if you understand what the plant needs to be healthy and productive. Starting a container garden doesn’t mean you’ll have to limit the varieties of plants you grow.

The tomatoes grew beyond the 6’ high frame and netting on 6.8.13
The tomatoes grew beyond the 6’ high frame and netting on 6.8.13
Replacing 6’ with 10’ poles
Replacing 6’ with 10’ poles
Tomatoes on 1.12.2014 need to be rehung.
Tomatoes on 1.12.2014 needs pruning.

Listed below are flowers, vegetables, and herbs that do well in containers.

The species are coded for quick reference to life span, cultural requirements, and recommended containers.

Vegetables

Vegetables

Annual

Hanging

Basket

Tub or

 2-5 gal. Container

Large Container

8-12 inch pot

Small Container 4-6 inch pot

Full Sun

Part Shade

Full Shade

High Yield

Transplant

Beans  (Bush or vine type)

A

X

X

X

X

Beets

A

X

X

X

Carrots

A

X

X

X

Cucumbers (Bush or vine type)

A

X

X

X

Eggplant

A

X

X

X

X

Onions  (especially bunching

A

X

X

Peas (Vining)

A

X

X

X

X

Peppers 

A

X

X

X

X

Radishes 

A

X

X

Spinach

A

X

X

X

Squash (summer & winter types

A

X

X

Swiss chard 

A

X

X

X

Tomato 

A

X

X

X

X

X

Tomato (Cherry)    

A

X

X

X

X

X

X

Turnips

A

X

X

Lettuce

A

X

X

X

X

X

Tips About Vegetables!  Don’t Think of Vegetable container gardens as “Plain Janes” and are only sources of food – they can be sources of visual pleasure, too!  Brightly colored kale, red leafy lettuce, eggplant, and peppers and colorful and beautiful.

Tips About Vegetables!  To get the most out of your limited space, choose high-yielding varieties.  These include beans, beets, carrots, lettuce, peppers, radishes, and some summer squash and tomatoes.

Tips About Vegetables!  Many vegetables can be grown successfully in 3 to 5-gallon containers, including corn, broccoli, cabbage, kale, leeks, melons, and the new seed-grown potatoes.  More compact vegetable varieties are grown every year.

TROUBLESHOOTING

COMMON PROBLEMS WHEN GROWING IN CONTAINERS

ProblemCauseWhat to do
Plants wilt although obtaining enough water.Insufficient drainage and aerationUse lighter soil mix, increase the number of drainage holes, use a combination with a higher percentage of organic matter.
Leaf edges die or “burn,” turning dry and brittle.High salt contentAt regular intervals, leach container by watering until water drains from drainage holes.
Plants “leggy,” spindly and unproductiveNot enough light or Too much nitrogenRelocate plant to the area receiving more light Apply fertilizer less often and allow water to drain through
Plants yellowing from the bottom, lack vigor, weak colorToo much water or Not fertile enoughLess frequently watering and check for good drainage. Use fertilizer with higher levels of nutrients.
You have stunted plants with purplish, dying leaf tips. Or if you have small fruit or seed development.Grown at a cool temperature and lacks enough phosphate.Move the container to a warm area. Increase phosphate in a base solution used for fertilizing.
Leaves with small holes or distorted leaf shapes.Insect damageUse insecticides suited to the type of insect causing the problem.
Plant leaves with spots, dead, dried areas, or powdery or rusty areas.Plant diseasesRemove diseased part of a plant and use a fungicide. If the problem is severe, discard the entire plant.